Obituaries

Constance Johnson
D: 2017-08-15
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Johnson, Constance
Wesley Shaw
D: 2017-08-13
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Shaw, Wesley
John Barnett
B: 1927-08-26
D: 2017-08-10
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Barnett, John
Helen Kurtz
B: 1923-01-23
D: 2017-08-09
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Kurtz, Helen
Milton Hutchins
B: 1925-06-27
D: 2017-08-04
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Hutchins, Milton
Lillian Wilbur
B: 1924-03-14
D: 2017-08-04
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Wilbur, Lillian
Richard Dudman
B: 1918-05-03
D: 2017-08-03
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Dudman, Richard
Elsie Lunt
B: 1925-09-04
D: 2017-08-03
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Lunt, Elsie
John Sweet
B: 1923-12-20
D: 2017-07-29
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Sweet, John
Raymond Daley
B: 1934-09-20
D: 2017-07-25
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Daley, Raymond
Ruberta Becker
B: 1942-12-14
D: 2017-07-22
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Becker, Ruberta
Rachel Krevans
B: 1957-06-15
D: 2017-07-19
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Krevans, Rachel
Robert Cooper
B: 1950-11-11
D: 2017-07-16
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Cooper, Robert
Yvonne Brann
B: 1934-11-22
D: 2017-07-15
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Brann, Yvonne
Annette Smith
B: 1943-01-28
D: 2017-07-12
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Smith, Annette
Richard Royal
B: 1931-12-24
D: 2017-07-11
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Royal, Richard
Russell Boynton
B: 1933-07-31
D: 2017-07-11
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Boynton, Russell
Gary Beal
B: 1950-12-17
D: 2017-07-03
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Beal, Gary
C. Wesley Ford
B: 1931-08-15
D: 2017-07-02
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Ford, C. Wesley
Morris Emery
B: 1937-01-09
D: 2017-06-29
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Emery, Morris
John Carman
B: 1937-02-05
D: 2017-06-24
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Carman, John

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1139 Main Street
PO Box 99
Mount Desert, ME 04660
Phone: (207) 244-3183
Fax: (207) 244-7514

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a burial service the right choice in your situation? Our overriding goal in developing this website has been to empower the families and individuals living in our community. We want them to come to us prepared to speak about their wishes, and that means giving them the quality of information they need in order to do that. After all, everyone needs enough background knowledge to speak confidently about their options. We're always delighted to answer your questions, and should we have neglected to include your particular question about burial services in general, or the specific burial services we offer; we urge you to call us at (207) 244-3183.

1. What does it cost to bury a person in a cemetery?
 
2. Does my loved one have to be embalmed prior to burial?
 
3. How much will a casket cost?
 
4. What is a burial vault, and why do I need to buy one?
 
5. What's involved in a cemetery burial?
 
6. Do I have to buy a headstone or grave marker?
 
7. Where do I purchase a headstone or grave marker?
 
8. What is "direct burial"?
 
9. Is direct burial right for our situation?
 
10. What services do you provide when I choose direct burial?
 
11. What is a graveside service?
 
12. What "extra" fees or charges will I need to pay?
 
13. When do I pay?
 
14. Who will write my loved one's obituary?
 
15. Should we request memorial donations instead of flowers?
 

Question #1What does it cost to bury a person in a cemetery?
Answer:First is the purchase price of the "right to use" the burial plot (unlike a real estate purchase, where you buy the land and all the structures on it; here you are only purchasing what is called the "interment rights" to the land). In addition, there are fees for the "opening" and "closing" of the gravesite; and any fees required to obtain the necessary permits and to maintain cemetery files and records. In addition, there's the fee for the use of any special equipment (such as a casket-lowering device); as well as the costs for any other services or items purchased. There's also the headstone or grave marker installation fee, and a one-time "perpetual care" (sometimes called "endowment care") fee paid to ensure your loved one's burial site is well-maintained.

Question #2Does my loved one have to be embalmed prior to burial?
Answer:This is a question we hear a lot. Many funeral homes suggest embalming if you're planning a viewing or visitation. That's because they want the experience to be as good as it can be for those in attendance, and proper embalming can ensure the deceased looks as good as possible.  But as a general rule, embalming is not necessary or legally required if the body is cared for in a relatively short amount of time. We do require embalming if a body is being held through the winter for a spring burial. Please contact us for  requirements.

Question #3How much will a casket cost?
Answer:The Federal Trade Commission states that average casket costs around $2,000. If you are concerned about casket costs, speak with your funeral director who can advise you on the most appropriate casket for your situation and your budget.

Question #4What is a burial vault, and why do I need to buy one?
Answer:Today, modern cemetery grounds are well-groomed, with vast expanses of green grass. A burial vault protects this pristine view, ensuring there is no sign of burial plots "settling". Certainly the vault also protects the casket; but the primary role of a burial vault is to protect the beauty of the cemetery environment.

Question #5What's involved in a cemetery burial?
Answer:If your loved one has not made previous arrangements for their burial, leaving you to pick the location of their interment, the first thing you'll need to do involves the selection of the cemetery and burial location within the grounds. You'll also choose the most suitable casket and burial vault, and provide us with the clothing you'd like your loved one to wear (and any 'special items' you'd like us to place in the casket) . Once payment is made, the date and time of interment is agreed upon. At that time, the cemetery grounds keepers will take care of the "opening" and "closing" of the grave and the proper placement of the casket in the burial vault.

Question #6Do I have to buy a headstone or grave marker?
Answer:Upon burial, we will place a temporary identification marker on your loved one's grave, but it is only intended as a placeholder until a permanent headstone or grave marker is set in place. Without one, your loved one's burial site will, when this temporary marker becomes illegible or is somehow removed, appear "unmarked".

Question #7Where do I purchase a headstone or grave marker?
Answer:We, and the cemetery where your loved one will be interred, have strong working relationships with trusted monument companies. When you are ready to order a granite headstone or bronze grave marker, we will come together to orchestrate its selection, manufacture and placement. Speak with your funeral director to get the details.

Question #8What is "direct burial"?
Answer:When we make arrangements for the direct burial of an individual, we are expediting their interment. There will be no funeral, memorial service or celebration-of-life; instead, we provide the physical care of the deceased (perhaps embalming their body, but certainly dressing and casketing) and then escort the casket to the cemetery for immediate burial.

Question #9Is direct burial right for our situation?
Answer:It's very hard to know without having the opportunity to speak with you. Direct burial works well when there are few mourners or if your loved one's wishes were for a simple interment. It's done quickly and professionally, without ceremony of any kind. With that said, what do you think? Does direct burial feel like the right course of action for you? Speak with a funeral professional to further explore the idea.

Question #10What services do you provide when I choose direct burial?
Answer:Your funeral director will complete and file the death certificate, obtain signatures on any required permits or authorizations, helps you select a cemetery in which to inter your loved one, as well as a casket and burial vault. He or she will oversee the physical care of the deceased: they will be dressed in clothes you've provided (or purchased from us), casketed, and then escorted to the cemetery for immediate burial. This same individual will witness the burial and provide you with copies of all pertinent papers for safekeeping.

Question #11What is a graveside service?
Answer:Rather than having a service in a church or funeral home chapel, and then adjourning to the cemetery for the burial; some families choose to gather solely at the cemetery. There, they are led through a ceremony prepared by a clergy person or celebrant and witness the in-ground committal of their loved one's casket. If the idea of a graveside service appeals to you, speak with your funeral director about your options.

Question #12What "extra" fees or charges will I need to pay?
Answer:Some of the things you'll discuss with your funeral director involve purchases made from outside vendors, and you will be asked to pay for those items at the time of the arrangement conference.  One of the most common is the fee charged by a newspaper to print your loved one's obituary. Another cash advance charge could be for clergy or musician's fees, floral arrangements, reception necessities, such as food/beverage or facility rental. Your funeral director will provide you with a detailed invoice for all cash advance items.

Question #13When do I pay?
Answer:The exact answer to this question largely depends upon the services, products and cemetery you've selected; but a good rule of thumb is to expect to pay at the time the service contract is signed (at the time of the arrangement conference, or soon afterwards). Speak with your funeral director to learn more.

Question #14Who will write my loved one's obituary?
Answer:We're tempted to answer this with another question: who would you like to write it? Perhaps you'd like to ask a friend or family member to do so; maybe you're thinking it's something you would like to do. Or perhaps you'd rather turn the duty over to your funeral director. He or she is experienced in obituary writing, and would be delighted to relieve you of the task; so don't hesitate to ask them to craft a suitable obituary.

Question #15Should we request memorial donations instead of flowers?
Answer:We don't like to use the word "should" when we speak to families about this issue. So the question becomes one of assessing your heart's desire: what do you really want? Then there's the question of your deceased loved one's wishes; exactly what would he or she think or feel? Most commonly we advise families to offer their community as many caring options as possible; some will send flowers, some will send donations; and some will even do both.

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